Grannies Homemade Noodles

I remember my grandma teaching me how to make homemade noodles. The only measurements she used was occasionally an eggshell to add a little extra water for dry dough. “just a half an eggshells worth.”

They were a favorite of mine growing up, a favorite of my daughters while she was growing up. Who knows who’s next? You’ll have to pretend you are learning at my elbow, I’ll have to pretend I’m your grandma, and I’ll have to figure out the measurements as I go, except an eggshells worth of water.

So, we get out the flour, 3 eggs and some salt. Wash the eggs, because we just got them from the chicken coop and they might still have some hen doo-doo on them. We will need a bowl, a mat or board to roll out the noodles, a rolling-pin, a knife or pizza cutter to cut them, oh and a fork for mixing.

Lets measure out some flour for the bowl. It’s an all-purpose flour we are using and I say, lets start with 2 cups in the bowl and more hanging around to dusting. Add about 3/4 tsp of salt. Now you go ahead and crack the 3 eggs into a bowl and mix them together lightly with a fork. You got eggshell in there? Well, that’s what we washed the eggs for, just in case. Now use one of the eggshell halves to get the chunk of shell out. For some reason its easier than trying to fish it out with your fingers. Okay?

We pour in the eggs and mix it together with a fork. It will make a kind of shaggy dough.

Mix it just until it is a cohesive lump, kind of like this:

If the dough was too too dry, too much flour left in the bowl, you can either pour in a shell of water or put a whole new egg into the mix. The eggs from our hens are a little smaller, so 4 would work better here. But for store bought large ones you should not need 4. Notice how we dusted the mat with flour before we dumped out the dough, good thinking on your part! Also dust your hands and now knead, or fold over the dough just a few times, for maybe 15 seconds. This will pull it together a bit for rolling out

this looks a bit better

Now it is ready for rolling. Get out your pin. Didn’t bring one? Just use mine, I have several. This one is my favorite and newest. It is a french rolling-pin. Now, be generous with the flour when rolling. Most of it will fall off later. Roll them out thinner than you want the noodles to be, as they always shrink back up some after cutting. Having trouble with the dough pulling back? Let it rest a couple of minutes. Go wash a pan or something and come back to it.  Then you can finish rolling it all out.You can either cut into fourths, generously flour and stack the fourths to cut, or just start cutting now. For the first time, straight cutting might be the best way. A pizza cutter makes this zippity-doo-daa fast.  Just roll it across the dough  about 1/4 inch apart. Make them shorter by cutting across again if you like or leave longer, they are your noodles after all.

When they are all cut (and if it doesn’t work well, re-roll and try again, but not too many times please), you lift them, one by one onto a pan to dry.  Grannie always dried them on a cookie sheet or around the edges of a cake pan. Or both if she made too many and ran out of pans. Now you can cook them in boiling water at this point. Salted boiling water. Or you can dry them for a few hours and store in a zip-lock bag.

my fancy pasta drier

So that’s what we do. Drape them around a pan. If you are drying them for another day, leave them out like this or on a cookie sheet to dry for a few hours. Go by and lift them with your fingers, gently tossing them to shake off loose flour and turn the wet sides up to dry. Leave them for a few more hours. Overnight works too. Then store them in a bag.

When it is time  to cook them, just boil lots of salted water, add and cook approx. 15 minutes. Less time if they are fresh, more if they are dried.

Now go wash your hands and give grannie a big hug. Grab a cookie on your way out. Don’t forget your noodles!

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